Short sight link to poor sleep and screen time

New research from Flinders University in Australia indicates people with myopia are more likely to experience poorer sleep quality than people with normal vision.


The study indicates that people with short-sightedness have more delayed circadian rhythms and lower production of melatonin, a hormone secreted in the brain and responsible for regulating sleep at night, compared to people with normal vision.


People affected by short-sightedness are familiar with the frustration of only being able to clearly see objects up close, but not a far distance.


Disruptions in circadian rhythms and sleep due to the advent of artificial light and the use of light-emitting electronic devices for reading and entertainment has become a recognised health concern in several fields, but its impact on eye health has not been studied extensively.


Adequate sleep is critical for learning, memory, sustained attention, academic performance at school, and general wellbeing of children during the early development.

These findings provide important evidence that optimal sleep and circadian rhythms are not only essential for general health, but also for good vision.


Melatonin is a hormone secreted by brain's pineal gland to maintain the body's sleep-wake cycle and circadian rhythms. We produce melatonin soon after the onset of darkness, peaking our secretion between 2-4am.


Our view:

A lot of digital devices emit blue light, which can suppress the production of melatonin and cause delay in circadian rhythms at night, resulting in delayed and poor sleep.


It is important to limit the exposure to digital devices in children, particularly at night, for ensuring good sleep and healthy vision.


Article written by

Mr K.Lakhani BSC MCOptom Dip Tp Ip

Specialist Optometrist.


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